Our Vocabulary

Words are the symbols by which we live. How often do we allow them to rule us, rather than we them? Here’s an example: How awesome is “awesome”?  It seems like there’s an inflation factor in the use of words.  People, nowadays, are always seeming trying to make things better or more attractive than what they are. The use of the word “awesome” is one of the words that prove my point. If we were to stumble upon something that is truly awesome, what words would we use to describe them? We wouldn’t really have anything, as that word has … Continue reading

Phobia This, Phobia That…

You know what I really like about strapping the suffix “phobia” onto the end of so many words… The words actually begin to lose their meaning, or actually mean nothing at all to begin with. Phobias are clinical conditions, and those who suffer from real phobias, as opposed to imagined ones, are being done the greatest disservice by those who have political agendas of trying to shame others by their use of words on a public that is unenlightened about the impact words actually have on the human psyche. If more people actually took the time to expand their vocabulary … Continue reading

Chocolate’s Got It Goin’ On…

…and you might too, if you eat enough of it (But not 25 pounds of it (You’ll see)). To many, chocolate is that dark, magical, mystical answer to life (Imagine Madeline Kahn singing “Sweet Mystery of Life.”) (Well, ok, maybe not). But I hope you get the drift. Psychologically, chocolate is great, but, then again, I’m a guy. For quite a few women, from what I’ve read and been told direct from the source, is that women claim it’s fantastic! Again, I hope you get the drift. Men are not quite as influenced by the effects of chocolate as women … Continue reading

A Question About Old Age

Did you know that the older we get, past a certain age, that our brain produces less brain cells? The good news is that brain cells continue to be produced until the day we die… just not as many. Even better news (to me, at least) is that neurons in mentally active elderly people branch off more often and have more dendrite connections between neurons than other folks who are not as active.  A slight drawback to this might be seen in how the elderly are more “set” in their ways than younger people.  It doesn’t mean that it’s impossible … Continue reading